Tag Archives: poetry

Just Another Day With Death – A Poem

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They call at two

They call at three

Makes no real difference to me.

The dead . . .

They care not what time I am forced to rise

They care for nothing

About nothing.

Where are my scrub pants

Dirty from the last prep

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Come, the dead urge me

They insist

I answer, after finding new pants

I’m coming.

Soon you will be

Lovely as can be

And all because of me.

Just another day with death.

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You Can Write That Book

 

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I woke at 3:30 this morning with a thought running through my head; write. I’ve been reading a book about how to get a first draft written in just 30 days. Well, I’m taking longer than 30 days but it’s working. Feels good to be on this decade-long project again with a fresh eye.

Are you one of the millions of Americans who think he/she has a good book in his/her head? If so, start it. Don’t sit paralyzed because you think you need an extensive outline or a dozen developed characters to start. Just begin writing and see where it takes you. If nothing else, you’ll enjoy the process. There are no hard and fast rules.

Writing has come naturally to me since I was a young girl. I churned out poetry, stories, and goofy limericks. Recently, I’ve penned some hilarious Senyru poems (like a haiku but funny and usually about people).

Want to share what you have written? Send me a note and maybe I can offer a suggestion or two. Let me know in the comments section below. I have many subscribers to this blog, so I can’t help all.

Take away? Please put your fingers to the keyboard and express yourself. I’ll leave you with a Senyru poem for the day (5-7-5 syllable lines). Have an awesome one!

Nurse Anne took samples

Samples of pee to the lab

Her work pissed her off

 

LOL! Sorry it’s tacky but it’s what I came up with in the moment. Bye, all . . .

What I Know is Nothing

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When I look up and into the sky blue sky

full of fluffy white fluffy clouds

Space is full of stuff – stuffed stuff or unstuffed

Beyond the blue and white above me are other planets, other skies, other guys

Naked, I shiver in the hot summer afternoon – but it’s a dry heat

In a coat, I shiver among snow drifts – but it’s a moist cool

Above my head are twinkling stars that twinkle like a star

Vastness of universe and limitations of my body and mind – not parallel like a parallel universe

What I know for sure is that I know nothing – like I know what I know, and it’s nothing

Sadness Has Shades – A Poem

 

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A painter uses color, texture -tangibles – to express herself.

I use words. My mind purges its stresses on white pages.

I sometimes think in gray.

Cloudy skies are the shade of sadness.

Sadness has shades, if you didn’t know it.

I’ve had sadness in blue shades. Blue, more intense than gray.

Gray has no passion, is sleepy and without great expression.

Blues offer bite. When dark, it’s angry sadness.

Light blue leaves room for improvement. Hope.

Black. Ever felt black?

Absorbing all light around you. Reflecting none.

Lack of light is black. I’ve felt black. I’ve lived black.

Black was the height of sadness, and all was dark.

Are you beige? Beige is boring. Not ugly but boring.

I lived beige for several years. It was a color of denial.

Same old. Same old. Beige. Sad but denying it.

Currently, I feel green. New growth is everywhere.

Soon it will be spring. Life has changed.

Green feels nice. Cooling and hopeful.

No sadness blankets this life.

But now and then, I do have other-color days.

Life is, after all,  a rainbow of colors.

Sadness can be in many colors and shades

But joy can, too.

Coloured air balloons

 

 

Alone

Where exactly is it? That ache that isn’t “real.”

The feeling of alone-ness

I hold and now reveal.

 

In the heart or chest somewhere

the heaviness sits hard

No respite for this weary soul

Yet, often, I’m off guard

 

Vices do I grab

To nothingness I hold

Weariness like weights

Inside me till I’m old

 

 

 

 

Spinning

I just spun around in my office chair – not once but over and over. My eyes closed tightly, my feet moving to keep the momentum. I was back in my childhood, when I’d spin on anything with a rope or chain. I was a notorious spinner on swings.

When I opened my eyes after going round in my office chair, I felt momentarily dizzy. Yet I smiled and remembered having a Kool-aid moustache, tousled ponytail, and tanned skin from spending days in the sun, playing, riding bikes . . . and spinning.

🙂

Wherever I Choose

Wherever I Choose

 

The ocean’s salty brine. Its cool and rhythmic waves. Sounds of seagulls, sandpipers, and faraway ships. I’m there in my mind.

 

Atop the breezy mountain. Among a field full of Black-eyed Susans. East Texas sand beneath my feet. The scent of watermelon in my lunch pail. I’m there in my mind.

 

It can take me anywhere – show me anything. Living in the moment . . . wherever I choose.

Fukushima – It May Affect Us More Than We Thought

Article in it’s entirety – http://readychimp.com/2014/01/18/how-to-naturally-remove-radioactive-particles-from-your-body-in-5-7-hours/

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Fukushima may soon become the greatest environmental disaster site the world has ever seen. If the more than 1300 fuel rods from the badly damaged reactor 4 fuel pool, that is perched 100 feet in the air, are not brought to the ground with absolute precision it could spew out the radiation equivalent of more than 15,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs. The pool rests on a badly damaged building that could easily come down in the next earthquake, if not on its own.[1] Spent fuel must be kept under water because each rod is coated with zirconium alloy, which will spontaneously ignite if exposed to air. Zirconium has long been used in flash bulbs for cameras, and burns with an extremely bright hot flame.

According to Arnie Gundersen, a nuclear engineer with forty years in an industry for which he once manufactured fuel rods, the ones in the Unit 4 core are bent, damaged and embrittled to the point of crumbling. Cameras have shown troubling quantities of debris in the fuel pool, which itself is damaged. The engineering and scientific barriers to emptying the Unit Four fuel pool are unique and daunting, says Gundersen. But it must be done to 100% perfection. Should the attempt fail, the rods could be exposed to air and catch fire, releasing horrific quantities of radiation into the atmosphere. The pool could come crashing to the ground, dumping the rods together into a pile that could fission and possibly explode. The resulting radioactive cloud would threaten the health and safety of us all.”[1] – Harvey Wasserman, senior advisor to Greenpeace USA and the Nuclear Information and Resource Service

According to long-time expert and former Department of Energy official Robert Alvarez, there is more than 85 times as much radioactive cesium on site as was released at Chernobyl.[1] With Cesium-137 the main issue is that it is mistaken for potassium by living organisms, and absorbed into almost all tissues emitting gamma and beta radiation. Although it is removed by the body fairly quickly, the damage to cells and to DNA can be devastating.[2] Of much greater concern is strontium-90, as described by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

“Strontium-90 is chemically similar to calcium, and tends to deposit in bone and blood-forming tissue (bone marrow). Thus, strontium-90 is referred to as a “bone seeker.” Internal exposure to Sr-90 is linked to bone cancer, cancer of the soft tissue near the bone, and leukemia.”[3]

Not to mention the genetic mutations that can occur as a result of radiation exposure.

“Teratogenic mutations result from the exposure of fetuses (unborn children) to radiation. They can include smaller head or brain size, poorly formed eyes, abnormally slow growth, and mental retardation. Studies indicate that fetuses are most sensitive between about eight to fifteen weeks after conception. They remain somewhat less sensitive between six and twenty-five weeks old.” [4]

We can still see the devastating long term effects from Chernobyl. The facts below are taken from the Chernobyl Children’s Project International document.

Chernobyl: The Facts

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http://www.ralphmag.org (photo source)

Here are some facts you need to know, almost 20 years after the Chernobyl disaster in the Ukraine.[5] Thyroid Cancer: The World Health Organization predicts 50,000 children will develop the disease in their lifetime. “Throughout Belarus, the incidence of this rare disease in 1990 was 30 times higher than in the years before the accident.” Leukemia: In the Gomel region of Belarus, incidences of leukemia have increased 50% in children and adults since the disaster. Other Diseases in Children: In addition to thyroid cancer and leukemia, UNICEF reports that between 1990 and 1994, nervous system disorders increased by 43%; cardiovascular diseases by 43%; bone and muscle disorders by 62%; and diabetes by 28%. Other Cancers: Swiss Medical Weekly published findings showing a 40% increase in all kinds of cancers in Belarus between 1990 and 2000. Some tumor specialists fear that a variety of new cancers may emerge 20-30 years after the disaster. Cases of breast cancer doubled between 1988 and 1999. Birth Defects: Maternal exposure to radiation can cause severe organ and brain damage in an unborn child. Five years after the disaster, the Ukrainian Ministry of Health reported three times the normal rate of deformities and developmental abnormalities in newborn children, as well as an increased number of miscarriages, premature births, and stillbirths. Cardiac Abnormalities: Heart disease in Belarus has quadrupled since the accident, caused by the accumulation of radioactive cesium in the cardiac muscle. Doctors report a high incidence of multiple defects of the heart – a condition coined “Chernobyl Heart.”

 

This partial article was taken from the following web page: http://readychimp.com/2014/01/18/how-to-naturally-remove-radioactive-particles-from-your-body-in-5-7-hours/

Hands, Hands, Hands

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There are people who have fetishes and then there are people who just pay more attention to a certain body part. I’d have to say that I notice hands.

When I meet someone and he/she shakes my hand, I look and notice my new acquaintance’s hands. Are the fingers long and thin? Short and stubby? Are the nails long or short? If it’s a man and he has “female” looking hands, I assume he has a job that doesn’t require much finger strength. A woman with dirt under her unpainted nails? I wonder if she’s a gardener . . . possibly herbs, my personal favorite thing to grow.

Hands say so much. I look down as I type and see wrinkles in mine. I see veins and red polished fingernails that need touching up. My hands say I have washed them many times in my forty-nine years of life. They say they belong to a short, full-figured woman who likes to look pretty. My hands have inner secrets, though; don’t yours?

My hands have done things they shouldn’t have. They’ve also done heroic things that few know about. They have patted the back of an infant, soothed a dying friend, and embalmed an autopsied murder victim (I’m a Funeral Science major). My hands have planted gardens, petted kittens, and made large pots of soup. They’ve scrubbed bathrooms, scraped icy windshields, and wiped tears from the eyes of a loved one in pain.

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Hands may not be the windows into the soul as the eyes are said to be but they carry out the work that needs to be done every day of our lives.

I love people’s hands. They’re wise and wacky, sad and happy, old and young – everything all at once. It’s hard to hide who we are. It shows in our beautiful hands.

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